Dirty Work…SPFX Dirt Kits

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Written by NZINGHA for ZFACEINC,nyc

Dirty work, but somebody’s got to do it! Well, guess what not all makeup is pretty makeup!

Makeup in any communication medium is used to help tell and sell the story. I mean think about it, if everyone looked handsome or pretty all the time in an action film, horror film or just everyday occurrence films we’d say “Hey!! That’s not realistic!”or we’d simply be confused about what happened in the film.

In vintage black and white films a lot was left to the imagination but in today’s modern world people want to see the what only a generation before imagined! We now have high tech special effects and all kinds of scenarios that require a special type of makeup.

Now let me be clear here, I’m not touting my ability to do high end extensive Special Effects Makeup but, I sure do appreciate it! I’m what you’d call a LIGHT SPFX Makeup Artist. The bigger guns I just call the SPFX Specialists.

Okay now on this post I’m here to talk about light SPFX makeup….DIRT, Grime, Soot and the like. In my Day Play kit I usually carry around some of everything because you never know what you’ll be asked to do with the makeup.

In my Dirt Kit I carry the following:

1) 3-4 types of dirt POWDER(black, dark brown, tan and sometimes desert (a brick brownish red powder) LIQUID SPRAY, DIRT BAG or CREAM DIRT.

2) 3 spray pouf units (to dispense powder in layers for a more real effect and less dirt on my hands so I can continue working)

3) Glycerine (I use this for sweat and tears effects, you can always substitute it with another element i.e. sunscreen, Vaseline, baby oil, etc.)

4) Blood (liquid (light, regular and dark dried thickened), fresh scarring blood, scab blood and blood capsules.

5) Tear Maker Vaporizer (use this item with caution cause it really makes people cry because the menthol is concentrated)

6) Stippling Sponge (I use this to add layers and visual texture)

7) A makeup protector cape ( to protect your actors clothes until they are dressed in full wardrobe from the wardrobe department. We don’t want to get anyone’s day clothes dirty! Lolol)

Here’s my mini “Dirt Kit”I take this one with me when I’m Day Playing, if more is needed the department head and department key will have full sized supplies.

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While I was working on Boardwalk Empire we had to prepare for a big explosion scene. This explosion was to occur on the Boardwalk with several stores, buildings and part of the actual Boardwalk being blown up. Thank goodness the professionals were there NYFD and NYPD and explosive experts.

Here I’ve applied soot & grime makeup to 2 Actors for the upcoming explosion scene for the HBO TV series Boardwalk Empire. My gentleman is in stage 1 of makeup. My lady is in complete makeup stage 1 & stage 2 of the process.

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Here I’m applying soot & grime makeup to my Actress for the upcoming explosion scene for the HBO TV series Boardwalk Empire.

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Here my Actress is showing off the first stages of her soot & grime hands. The second step is more dirt/soot under the nails and some blood and cuts (imagining broken glass flying and brusing of some sort)

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Ve Neil on Blood and Dirt Effects

Green + Street on working Dirt Effects

Love Manhattan Wardrobe Supply, it’s usually where I get specialty items like my dirt and other hard to find supplies.

http://www.wardrobesupplies.com/categories/make-up-and-hair/blood-and-effects/fleet-street-dirt-works

Overall, every MUA has their own technique in creating the look. No two techniques are the same but you can learn from different artists and create your own. When you’re creating a dirt look you have to really think about the context of the scene and what would actually happen in that scene. Ask yourself these questions:

1) What’s the action going on in that scene?

2) What does the script call for?

3) What does the set look like?

4) What is the wardrobe doing?

5) What level of dirt does the scene call for?

6) What type of dirt? Wet, dry, lumpy, oily, black, brown, red, tan?

7) What type of blood would be needed to complete the look or if blood is needed at all?

Okay, I’m done…hope this was useful to you. Signing out!

Paint On viZionaire!
NZINGHA

*Artist Spotlight | Janice & Denise Tunnell

Written by NZINGHA for ZFACEINC,nyc

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An online beauty conversation with Muas and Beauty Experts Denise & Janice Tunnell. Our goal is to inspire and educate one conversation at a time. We bring the Beauty Industry to you every Sunday night at 9pm EST. …read more

http://www.blogtalkradio.com/beautytalkwithillusions#ixzz34lBJMtIB

*Artist Spotlight | Max Factor

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Written by NZINGHA for ZFACEINC,nyc

Max Factor – The Man Behind The Make-Up

Max Factor born September 15, 1872 was of Polish Jewish decent who worked as a wigmaker and makeup artist for Russian stage productions in the late 1800s. Factor fled the east European pogroms and emigrated to the U.S. in 1902. He found himself in California 10 years later as the motion picture industry took root there.

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Factor took work as a makeup and hair stylist for film stars, and in 1914 he invented “Supreme Grease Paint,” a face makeup that still exists today

Max Factor began his career as an apprentice to a wig maker. By the age of 20, he was running his own makeup shop. Before Max Factor, few women used cosmetics. Factor popularized both the word “makeup” and the use of the cosmetic repertoire.

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Back in the 1930’s and 40’s, during the glory days of Hollywood, the world of movie make-up was dominated by Max Factor. Creating false eyelashes, the eyebrow pencil, lip gloss, and pancake makeup, Factor created a whole new language for big screen cosmetics.

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Jean Harlow, Claudette Colbert, Bette Davis, and virtually all of the major movie actresses were regular customers of the Max Factor beauty salon, located near Hollywood Boulevard.

Inevitably, once the actresses had been made to look so stylish on screen, they wanted to maintain the same effect in everyday life, so they wore the new Max Factor ‘makeup’ in personal appearances.

Soon, women unconnected with the theatre or the film industry were asking for the makeup, so that they too could look glamorous. It was in 1927 that Max Factor introduced his first cosmetics to be sold to non-theatrical consumers.

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Max Factor specialized in transforming ordinary people into dazzling stars. Its glory days were with the golden age of the movie studios, when the stars used to provide product endorsements for as little as a dollar. Their glamour rubbed off on Max Factor, and vice versa.

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Max Factor developed the celebrity endorsement concept, beginning with Clara Bow in the 1920s. Since then, stars including Rita Hayworth, Lana Turner, Marilyn Monroe, Jean Harlow, Judy Garland, Joan Crawford, Jaclyn Smith and Denise Richards amongst numerous others have all represented the brand. Many of his celebrity clients also appeared in full-color magazine ads to promote his cosmetics.

The first Celebrity Makeup Ads began with Max Factor Cosmetics. The ads featured movie stars: Judy Garland, Norma Shearer, Joan Crawford, Rita Hayworth, Dorothy Lamor, Susan Hayward and a host of others.

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The advertising campaign claimed that every girl could look like a movie star by using Max Factor makeup.

Max Factor is credited with many cosmetic innovations. Some of his innovations were the first motion picture makeup in 1914, lip gloss in 1930, Pan-Cake Makeup, forerunner of all modern cake makeups in 1937, Pan-Stik Makeup in 1948, Erace, the original cover-up cosmetic in 1954, and the first “waterproof” makeup in 1971.

An abbreviated timeline of Max Factor:

1914: Created the first makeup made specifically for motion pictures, a thinner greasepaint made in 12 shades. It was in cream form and packaged in jars, as opposed to the thicker stick grease paints used for theatre.

1920: Developed the “Color Harmony” principles of makeup, which held that “certain combinations of a woman’s complexion, hair and eye coloring were most effectively complemented by specific makeup shades”.

1925: Introduces “Max Factor’s Supreme Nail Polish”, a metal pot of beige-colored powder that is sprinkled on the nails and buffed with a chamois buffer. It gives nails shine and some tint.

1927: Creates “Society Nail Tint”, a small porcelain pot containing rose colored cream. Applied to the nail and buffed, it gives a natural rose color. “Society Nail White” also hits the market. It is a tube of chalky white liquid that is applied under nail tips and left to dry. The end result resembles the modern French manicure.

1928: Developed makeup, made specifically for use in black-and-white films. Max Sr. was awarded an Oscar for this innovation.

1930: Invented Lip Gloss

1932: Developed a line of “Television Makeup”, specifically to meet the needs of television.

1934: Introduces Liquid Nail Enamel, forerunner of today’s nail enamels.

1935: Opened the unique Max Factor Makeup Salon in Los Angeles.

1937: Created PanCake, forerunner of modern cake makeup, originally developed for color films.

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1938: Max Factor died at age 59. Max Factor Jr. expands the family run business internationally.

1940: Created Tru Color Lipstick, the first smear-proof lipstick.

1948: Developed PanStik makeup.

1954: Created Erace, the original concealer, and developed a line of cosmetics specifically for color television’s needs. (This line remains the standard for TV makeup.)

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1971: Invented the first “waterproof” makeup.

First African American Super Model to represent Max Factor Cosmetics | Beverley Johnson

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Max Factor CC Creams

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Thank You Max! — in Ode’ to Max Factor.

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Book written about the life of Makeup Artist, Inventor, Innovator, CEO Max Factor written by Fred Basten

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http://www.nytimes.com/1996/12/29/magazine/the-man-who-made-the-faces-up.html

What’s in the Pro Makeup Kit?

20140421-132651.jpgWritten by NZINGHA for ZFACEINC,nyc

Okay, so Ive been asked this question over and over again by Pro’s as well as novice Makeup Artists and makeup enthusiasts alike…”What’s in a Professional Makeup Artists Kit?” Young Makeup Artists have you ever wondered how much money it will take to build your Pro Kit?

Have you ever been asked by the production company the “INVENTORY LIST” for your Pro Kit during filling out your “Start Paperwork” (this is required for the reimbursement of product in the rental of your Pro Makeup Kit)?

Well, every Professional Makeup Artist should have an “INVENTORY LIST” of what’s in their kit and the makeup and makeup supplies, tools and miscellaneous items they have in storage. If you don’t have it it’s time to do some “Spring Cleaning” and organize that kit! Out with the old and in with the new!

Just to help you get started, here’s a sample of an older version of my former Pro Makeup Kit. Some items are a staple in the kit and others have been updated as new and more efficient products are being manufactured. Your inventory list would best serve you in an Excell Spread Sheet so you can list all items, quantities and price points for each item.

NZINGHA’s Makeup Inventory List
(SAMPLE)
Shu Uemura Makeup Case $800.00
2 Small Lavender Suitcases $300.00
Makeup Brushes (Various Brands) $2000.00
1 MAC Lip Conditioner $12.50
1 MAC Tinted Lip Conditioner w/SPF $14.00
1 MAC Embelish Glitz Gloss $14.00
8 MAC Brow Set (Various Shades) $12.50
6 MAC Eye Brow Pencil $13.50
1 MAC Fix + Spray $15.00
1 MAC EZR $29.00
1 MAC Day SPF 15 Light Moisture $25.00
1 MAC Moisture Feed/Skin $27.50
1 MAC Strobe Cream $25.00
8 MAC Select Cover Up (nc20, nc45, nw30, nw25, green, peach, nw40, nc30) $14.00
1 MAC Fast Response Eye Cream $27.50
20 MAC Lip Glass (Various Shades) $14.00
6 MAC Lipliners $12.00
1 MAKE Ready Brightening Mist $32.00
1 MAKE Away Mist Away $32.00
1 MAKE Under Transparent Coverage $32.00
4 MAKE UP FOR EVER Waterproof Eyebrow Kit $24.00
1 MAKE UP FOR EVER Corrective Makeup Base $24.00
6 MAKE UP FOR EVER Diamond Powder $24.00
2 MAKE UP FOR EVER Loose Powder $26.00
1 MAKE UP FOR EVER #5 Camouflage Cream Palette $36.00
1 MAKE UP FOR EVER Lipliner Concealer $18.00
6 MAKE UP FOR EVER Glitters $18.00
1 MAKE UP FOR EVER Metalizer $36.00
1 MAKE UP FOR EVER Puff Pouch $35.00
1 MAKE UP FOR EVER Freelancer Bag $45.00
1 MAKE UP FOR EVER Touch Up Smock and Bag $
1 MAKE UP FOR EVER Makeup Brush Case $32.00
1 MAKE UP FOR EVER Set Bag $45.00
1 MAKE UP FOR EVER Makeup Apron $30.00
2 Kevyn Aucoin Liquid Shimmer (Various Shades) $24.00
3 Kevyn Aucoin Pencil Liners (Black, Brown, White) $26.00
2 Kevyn Aucoin Lip Gloss (Bliss, Aurora) $27.00
2 Kevyn Aucoin The Pure Powder Glow $37.00
1 Kevyn Aucoin The Essential Eye Shadow Set $45.00
4 Kevyn Aucoin The Expert Lip Tint $34.00
12 Kevyn Aucoin The Sensual Skin Enhancer $45.00
1 Revlon Fineline Natural Brow Pencil $3.14
2 Revlon Fineline Natural Brow Pencil Refills $3.00
6 Prescrptives Liquid Eyeshadow (Various Shades) $24.00
6 Prescriptives Adjustable Coverage Pressed Powder (Various Shades) $35.00
6 Prescrptives Colorclick Eye Sticks (Various Shades) $16.50
12 Prescriptives Liquid Foundations (Various Shades) $32.00
12 Lancome Juicy Tubes (Various Shades) $16.50
1 Laura Mercier Foundation Primer $34.00
1 NARS Body Glow $60.00
6 JAPONESQUE FAST LASH THICKENING FIBERS $14.00
2 JAPONESQUE Heated Eyelash Culers $14.00 2 JAPONESQUE Brow/Groomer/Scissor/Comb $13.40
2 JAPONESQUE Preo Prescision Lash Curler $34.00
1 Calvin Klien Liquid Crystals for Body $20.00
1 Calvin Klein Eye Glass $25.00
6 Posner Cover Cream $6.99
7 Vera Moore Lipstick Palettes $30.00
3 Sally Hansen Airbrush Legs $12.95
6 Posner Derma Color Camouflage Crème $6.99
6 NZINGHA Beaute` Lipglosses (Various Shades) Not Yet Priced
6 Pack of Purell Hand Sanitizer $4.00
2 Double Sided Metal Makeup Pencil Sharpener $20.00
1 Samuel Par Blemish Pen $12.00
1 Duo Eyelash Glue $3.00
1 Mavala Clear Nail Polish $3.75
1 Travel Size Visine $4.00
1 Box of Square Cotton Makeup Remover $12.00
1 Box of Square Makeup Blotters $30.00
1 Carmex Jar $5.00
1 Nosehair Clipper $12.99
Small Set Lip Palette Cases (Various Lipstick) $25.00
2 Alcone Professional Foundation Palette $30.00
1 Hard Candy Training Brow Dark Hair Girl $24.00
1 Small 5 Comparment Makeup Pallette $27.95
1 Small Tortoise Set Foundation Palette $30.00
1000 Small Pink Cotton Squares $36.00
1000 Triangular Sponges $100.00
1000 Small Clear Spatulas $36.00
25 boxes Double Sided Point Q-Tips $51.25
2500 Double Sided Small Round Q-Tips $.33ea
1 Viseart Professional Makeup-Palette $30.00
12 Mark Traynor’s Temporary Face & Neck Lift (Brown) $19.00
1 Dozen Alcone Professional Makeup Sponge $20.00
1 Small Black Fan $19.99
2 Double Sided Black Mesh Makeup Bags $12.99
1 Prestige Individual Eyelash Curler $16.00
6 Small Pack Brumisateur Evian $10.00
2 Small Artisan & Artist Standup Hand Mirror $30.00
3 Cinema Secrets Brush Cleaner 32oz Containers $25.00
1 Box of Dental Floss Sticks $4.35
1 Travel Size First Aid Kit $5.00
1 Johnson & Johnson Baby Oil Gel $3.95
24 Case Lashes (Various Styles) $24.00
1 Pack of Straws (36 units) $.99
6 Pack of Wet Wipes

Now here’s a visual update of my current kit found on Pinterest. This visual display makes it easy for me to know what’s in my kit as assisting me in creating the updated inventory list.

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IMATS NYC 2014…review

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Written by NZINGHA for ZFACEINC,nyc

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The line for entry for PRO CARD HOLDERS!!

This years IMATS (International Makeup Artists Trade Show) felt very different for me. As the excitement grew for me toward this years upcoming IMATS I was anticipating it’s greatness! Yet sadly, somehow it fell a bit short of my expectation.

Being a Gold Card holder does have perks to it however this year the “perks” weren’t necessarily “perk”ulating so to speak. I waited on that long line for entry, only because I wasn’t quite sure if I could just breeze past the line to the check in desk inside.

This year my card was set to expire and I didn’t know it until one amazingly helpful staff member immediately took care of the situation online as I was registering and immediately issued me a new card. This card renewal happened on Thursday and I got my new card info in 10minutes.

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When I returned on Sunday for my full on “Haul”. I’d gone to one of the floor staff as you enter by the front desk. I told her I was a Gold Card carrier and showed her my badge.

She proudly and abruptly went on to say “Did you register?” I said “Yes”she went on to say “Well, you need to register and get a wrist band in order to enter!”. The male staff member that was standing next to her overheard the dialog. So I then showed her my wristband id, she said, “So, that was on Friday you need to register for today!”

My first instinct was to give this rude young lady one good backhanded thunderclap into reality and respect when speaking to an older person (although I’ve been told I look like I’m in my late 20’s, don’t get it twisted!!).

I thought once again I will take the high road and proceed to the front desk. The male staff member said “I’m sorry Miss please come with me and immediately have me a new band and sent me on my way.

The Gold Pro Card status states as such on the web:
“The Gold Pro Card is available to make-up artists represented by agencies, top trade unions or make-up effects shops or those working in theater. With the Gold Pro Card, you get free entry into all IMATS locations and pro-only times at select IMATS, as well as a 50-percent discount on Make-Up Artist magazine subscriptions, a 10-percent discount at the Make-Up Artist Shop and other benefits.”

It also said when I initially applied for the card in 2011,Gold card holders would not have to wait on line for entry. Overall I had a lacklustre experience at this years IMATS.

Last years Pro day was a pleasure. And there was a uniqueness to the treatment of the Pro Artist not to mention wine and appetisers being served as you browsed the isles, mingled with your colleagues, made reserved orders with vendors and shopped till you dropped.

This year seemed as if the show were geared toward the makeup enthusiast. Enthusiasts who just wanted to shop for cheap makeup.

No interest in demos from Pro’s who donate their time and skill. And no interest in panel discussions with the Pro’s and most definitely no interest in the Makeup Artist Museum. It just felt like a massive “selfie” crowd that could care less about the Pro aspect of makeup or its proper application.

This years “Haul” for me was rather scant as several items were sold out. Lets just say for my future attendance I will only relegate it to the Pro day.

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Viseart Eyeshadow Palettes

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The Makeup Bullet

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Royal & Langnickle 13piece Travel Brushes/LUST

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The London Brush Company Solid Brush Cleaner in “Young Coconut” scent

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Alconeathome & Graftan Lipglosses in “Joy” & “What Lolita Wants”

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Contestants from the SyFy Channel’s show “Face Off”.

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The Makeup Museum exhibit

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IMATS Student Makeup Competition

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Body Art Makeup Artists work:

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Why Do Most Makeup Artists Wear Black? (Part 2)

Written by NZINGHA for ZFACEINC,nyc

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Wearing black is the Artists “uniform” if you will. Wearing black is tasteful and is well groomed not over or under dressed. As one of my favourite designers Tom Ford says ” Dressing well is a form of good manners”. Hospitality is also a form of dress (atmospherical dress, setting the tone of your dressing room). Also your clients should only be able to see you and not all that you wear or anyone else on set while you’re working as being too flashy can cause distractions (more about that below).

We first discussed the functionality of black in the theater, what types of clothes to wear, some unconventional things to know in what to wear and why. I shared with you some additional Makeup Artists thoughts in Why Do Most Makeup Artists Wear Black? (Part 1)Okay, so lets talk a bit about the psychology and history of why Artists wear black.

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The fashion world goes hand in hand with the beauty world. In fact this marriage had a plan starting long ago. Designers like Coco Chanel made “The Little Black Dress” in the 20’s and it was a must have for every woman’s wardrobe because it was stunning, simple yet powerful.

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It’s was said to make every woman look their best. Well worn for a night out and looking elegant. Best dressed for ladies in suits and now trousers for work during the day. Chanel was always known for her black and white clothing designs making the wearer most chic after the post war era. Black and white both became a power colors. But black always signified both power, authority and irreplaceable style.

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And because Chanel had such an impact on the fashion world her mark has clearly been left. Now designers make their most stunning pieces in black.

So wearing black became a fashion forward trend. Not to mention wearing black creates an optical illusion in making one look more slender in their garments. Many years later not only was wearing black functional for working backstage but it also became “fashionable”.

CHANEL MODERN STYLISH COMFORTABLE FOOTWEAR

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Speaking of fashion, when I first saw the film “The Devil Wears Prada” I had a range of emotions. I went from level 1 angry to level 3 angrier! Why? Well, because I’m a firm believer in people wearing what they want to wear within reason at work.Then I thought to myself “Now it’s the truth! If you were an oil rigger you would not show up to work in LaBoutin’s, if you were a doctor you wouldn’t show up in a policeman’s uniform. Snap out of it!! It’s not personal, it’s business. And you are your business, you are your brand.”

So ask yourself viZionaire…”What am I selling?” Are you selling clothing, the products found in your makeup kit or are you selling your skill and expertise as a Makeup Artist? What are you selling…be clear about that and that will help you establish who you and your skill as an Artist.

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I wished I could come to work in this outfit however what would my level of comfort be? I’ve done it but modified my footwear. And how would I be perceived by the client? Taken seriously or a one shot deal, never to be hired again. Choosing your wardrobe is strategic and you must use wisdom on so many levels. You definitely want to leave an impression on the client yet save your personal fashion statement for your personal down time.

EXAMPLE: While working on set one day a fellow Artist came to set with an arm full of jangling bracelets. They were beautiful gold bangles, simply stunning. However while we were shooting we had to stop several times due to the fact that the sound man (who was recording live sound) could not only hear the actors doing their lines but hear those bangles just jingling!! They eventually got a word spoken to them and ultimately wound up removing them. CAUSING DISTRACTIONS AND DISTURBANCES ON SET IS HIGHLY FROWNED ON.

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The point here is, ….you dress the part and appropriately for your position in your career. If you work in the fashion, beauty and entertainment industry you dress fashionably, smartly comfortable and polished. My thoughts on “The Devil Wears Prada” I will discuss in an upcoming post.

EXAMPLE : I remember when I was working on the set of Spider-Man 3 for three straight months I would see the director of the film Sam Ramy and be amazed. Why? Because he wore a suit and shirt everyday! We worked long hours 12-16 hours in a day some days and he was always well groomed. It was rare to see but it reminded me of the splendour and dignity of Old Hollywood. Back then directors wore suits and Makeup Artists (back then it was all male Makeup Artists) wore suits or lab coats. This was how the studios crew came to work.

Makeup artist Jack Pierce and Conrad Veidt on the set of THE MAN WHO LAUGHS (1928).

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Jack Pierce in the makeup room with Boris Karloff 1935. Jack is wearing a lab coat.

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http://www.cherrybombed.com/2012/10/boris-karloff-becoming-frankenstein/

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In closing viZionaire all I’m saying to you is this. This business should not be and is not for everyone. You set the tone for how you and your work will be perceived. You set the tone for how the thought of a “Pro Makeup Artist” is perceived. So, lets strive to be excellent and restore dignity, and respectability to the title of “Makeup Artist”.

Why Do Most Makeup Artists Wear Black? (Part 1)

Written by NZINGHA for ZFACEINC,nyc

20140403-174907.jpgI’ve been asked this question on several occasions about why Makeup Arists always wear black. My response is not just about wearing black but about what we wear and how we present ourselves in general. You may not be the top fashionista but at least be presentable and groomed. You may not have the money now to build your wardrobe but in time you will and then you build your wardrobe piece by piece.

With that said here’s my answer to the question.

A: The real reason why Makeup Artists (and work crews) originally started wearing black was because in the live theater world backstage the crew wore black so they could still keep working backstage and not be seen by the audience while working.Crew would blend into the background with the black curtains and walls and usually everything backstage is black.
~NZINGHA

Just a few of My personal suggestions.

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1) Personal hygiene
…lets just say we work extremely close to people in their faces and in tight places most times

2) Keep a clean kit
…most people think that this is not important to what you wear on set BUT a clean kit is part of your wardrobe! It speaks volumes about how you are personally, how you keep yourself and the health, care and hygiene of the products you use and how you will ultimately care for your clients.

3) Wear comfortable shoes and clothing
…being comfortable is key here because you will find yourself in some situations where you will be working exceedingly long hours or varied weather conditions. Also a word to the wise as a caution… Never be too flashy with you dressing i.e. your designer wear and jewelry collection (save it for your personal down time). I once heard my client fire the wardrobe stylist because she felt like she was attempting to out dress her, look better than her (yes it’s they’re insecurity but I can cost you your job). Stay well groomed yet dress smartly.

4) Wearable workable nail length
…simple clean manicured nails for the men and clean groomed mid length nails for the ladies.

5) Know what time it is
…in other words get info about what,where, whom, time, location and weather conditions are going to be. This will put you ahead of the game so you don’t look or be prone to act the fool.

LETS HEAR FROM OTHER MAKEUP ARTISTS…

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A few more answers from other Makeup Artists about what they wear to work and why. All great answers…check it out.

A: A call sheet (the document supplied by your agency prior to a shoot, which contains all the details about the job you have been booked for) very rarely mentions clothing, but there are exceptions. On occasion for instance, it might say “dress warm” if the shoot is going to be outside on location. Once on a trip to Barbados, I remember we were instructed not to wear army camouflage clothing, and another time when we shot a campaign at a working men’s club in central London, the guys in the creative team were told they had to wear long trousers. At fashion shows when you are working for a brand, you might be given a team T-shirt. At the ones I’ve done for MAC, for example, I was supplied with a MAC Pro tee and it was requested that I wear it along with their signature shade (black). Beyond this, it’s really up to you. ~Private

A: Luckily, when I’m working everyone’s eyes are on the model, not on me. Most of my work wardrobe is black. I typically prefer pants or jeans and like flat shoes for the sake of comfort and practicality. Skinny black jeans teamed with a plain sheer T-shirt or crisp white bat-wing shirt and a pair of black sneakers is my usual uniform. If the conditions are cool, I will throw a jumper on and add a coat with leather lapels to the mix. Sometimes I will wear a cute little black dress paired with tights and pixie boots, and depending on my mood and the weather, I may pop a cashmere chunky-knit cardigan on top. Once I’m dressed, it’s all about getting my makeup kit in the car and getting to the job on time.
~ miss_supra

A: Black simple clothes (T-shirt, pants, skirt & tights, etc)

Closed in black flats, some sets and workplaces require closed toed shoes for health and safety reasons. Avoid dangly bracelets, earrings, necklaces etc.

The idea is to look chic & stylish yet be comfortable because you’ll be on your feet all day long. Try to avoid trends that are too out there as your outfit will detract from your work.

Same goes with your makeup, hair and personal grooming. Simple elegant makeup and well groomed hair that is styled well for medium to short length or tied/pinned back if long will enhance your image as a professional makeup artist. ~Private

A: I’m not trying to look cute on set, not trying to impress anyone with my outfit. My makeup and hair are always done professionally. I figure the scrubs help me blend into the background when I am not needed, I don’t disappear on set when I am doing touch-ups, and no one forgets who the makeup artist is on crew. ~ Samantha Reeder

A: When I went to my makeup training schools, they always advise us to wear black. They say it’s the signature “makeup artist attire.” The same thing was followed when I was in L’Oreal. I did retail training for the beauty advisers of Shu Uemura and the rule was to have all our makeup artists wear black. Well it only makes sense — black looks professional, it almost never looks unpolished and it any dirt hardly looks obvious on it. ~Dior

THIS COMES FROM AN UNDISCLOSED MAC COSMETICS EMPLOYEE.

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Wow!!! Who knew? And Yes, after reading the ryder, I strongly agree with MAC’s policy, with the exception of Artists who are working freelance and not for MAC but on location sets. Most freelance Artists are not sales people on freelance fashion, music, misc. projects or Union film, TV and Broadway projects.

MAC is a “brand” and has irrefutable standards and that I applaud. In addition the same grooming standard should apply to all makeup professionals. If you are a Pro Freelance Makeup Artist you should consider yourself a “brand” too. It’s simply wise business on the behalf of a freelancer.

“Here’s word for word in my paperwork”
~ Unknown

*All M.A.C Staff are required to wear 100% professional black.

*A white shirt may be worn with a buttoned-up jacket or cardigan/sweater.

*Black clothing must be clean, not fade, pulling or torn (cotton is not recommended due to fading).

*Materials with Lycra of some stretch are ideal (more durable and color fast).

*Translucent or sheer clothing must be tasteful and worn over/under solid black clothing.

*Clothes must be tastefully fashionable and appropriately fit.

*No brand logos permitted.

*Pinstripes and stitching detail need to be minimal.

*Scarves must be black, but ties may have some color.

*A M.A.C pin, chain must always be worn.

*Jewelery and accessories such as belts must be black fashionable and appropriate.

*Shoes must be professional , black and not scuffed. Tennis shoes, flip flops, “nursing shoes” or slippers are not permitted.

*Hosiery is optional, but if worn must be black or neutral. Socks also be black.

*Athletic wear such as fleece, or yoga pants and “hoodies” are not permitted.

*M.A.C theme/even shirts such as Viva Glam should only be worn on theme days as a group and not individually.

*Hair accessories and black hats may be worn at the counter so long as it does not obscure or shadow the face.

*Baseball caps are not permitted.
Hair must be neat, clean, well groomed, styled and should reflect the current trends in the industry.

*There is no restriction with hair color.

*A full well executed make-up must be worn to work at the start of shift. (For example, foundation 3 eye shadows, mascara, blush, three lip products are required (lipstick, liner, lip gloss).

*Employees may be required to wear applicable “look” associated with a new product launch. The requirement of wearing such look shall be determined by “your market” for the product(s) being launched and the current industry trends, and may be changed at discretion of M.A.C at any time.

*Personal hygiene needs to be regularly monitored bt the individual. Nails should be manicured and toes should have a pedicure when open toes are worn. M.A.C nail polish must be worn.

*Deodorant or other personal alternative to odor prevention must be qorn at all times.

*It is preferable for fragrance to be worn. If worn, the fragrance must be a M.A.C fragrance.

*Fresh breath is mandatory. If you smoke, please be sure to wash and sanitize your hands prior to returning to te counter and serving customers. Breath mints are required ater smoking.

*Absolutely no gum – small mints are acceptable.

*Cell phones, pagers etc. should be turned off and kept with personal belongings and are not permitted to work on the counter or in your brush belts. Emergency calls can be accepted at the counter.

M.A.C is admired for respecting and embracing individuality. However, it is important to remember that while at work you are expected to look, act and service our customers in the most professional manner possible.