black|Up! Cosmetics | Review

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black|Up! Cosmetics | Review
Written by NZINGHA for TheGlamSquadFiles™

I have been wanting to review this product since it was first introduced in the mid 90’s!!! black|Up Cosmetics Paris. Yes, I have been an avid follower of this product line. They were first released overseas in Paris in the mid 90’s and were doing what seemed to be well then suddenly disappeared!!! I was mortified because before I could even give them shout outs they had gone AWAL!!

I first found out about them when I was on tour with Mary J. Blige as her Makeup Artist. We had a brief stop over performance and promotion in Paris. I met a few young ladies there who introduced me to the line and told me where I could get it! And I indeed found it and purchased some foundations in the line and bought them back to the US! In fact I had used it for my own personal use and also for a few of my clients and I loved it!! Until I ran out and could no longer access the product!!!

The black|Up Cosmetics Pro Catalogue. Full Color product selections with high gloss pages. 75 pages of beauty!! Magnifique’!!

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PANIC MODE 101!!! Client loves the colors you’re using…wants you to buy the product for them for their personal use…me…PRO MAKEUP ARTIST…BLANK STARE!!! WTH!!!! I can’t find them anywhere!!!! WHAT DO I TELL MY CLIENT…until now…close to 10years later! Revamped, repackaged, reformulated and rebranded…ready for action! IT WAS WORTH THE WAIT HONEY!!! YASSSSSS!!! Don’t miss this opportunity guys! I say stock up on this amazing brand designed unapologetically for Women of Color!!

Here I am in full black|Up makeup I used all the colors in one shot to get this makeup look. I use the CC Cream Foundation #04 daily(this is my Summer Tanned Skin color, my Winter color is #03,this is my normal skin toned color)

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While on tour in Europe numerous times going to the best makeup shops I could barely find beautiful colors for Women of Color!!! I was highly offended!!! Then I thought really??? I mean for real people of Color are truly a minority in Europe…but not in the rest of the world so what can you expect from this market! And imagine a line for Women of Color over here would fly off the shelves simply because their beauty needs are being met!

I’m not here to apologize for my blackness or for any comments I make regarding any brand that is not inclusive of Women of Color. As far as I’m concerned I want to solely deal with brands that speak to my complexion without having to worry if I’m going to look grey, green or just chalky. I want a brand that suits my complexion and yes, there needs to be more brands worldwide for Women of Colors choosing!! NO APOLOGIES!!

Here are the colors that were sent to me and I am thrilled to say …I ABSOLUTELY LOVE THIS LINE!! Everything about this line I LOVE!!

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Here are the eyeliners (liquid gold and orchid colored gel pencil eyeliner) and concealer

20141009-201547.jpgI am in absolute awe of this liquid eyeliner!! I can’t believe I’ve never had anything to compare to it EVER in my Pro Kit!!! And honey I’ve had my kit full of products that have come and gone in my 27year career!! I’ve got to order like 4 more of these!!! Long wear and waterproof for real waterproof (even with dish soap I couldn’t take it off!)

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Here are the blushes in the colors 01(Fuschia Pink) and 11(Shimmery Coral).

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http://www.blackupcosmetics.com/makeup/face/blush/new-blush.html

PRICE | $25.50

Here’s the black|Up CC Cream Foundation in #03 and on my hand 04

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http://www.blackupcosmetics.com/cc-cream-multi-action-complexion-correcting-foundation.html
PRICE | $39.50

Here we have the glorious Complexion Enhancer/ Embellisseur de Teint (EMB03)

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Here’s the black|Up Poudre Sublime (PS04)

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PRICE | $36.50

Here is the Creme Poudre’ (NFC03)

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http://www.blackupcosmetics.com/makeup/face/foundation/cream-to-powder-foundation-new-formula.html
PRICE | $41.00

Rich Moisturising Lipsticks

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http://www.blackupcosmetics.com/makeup/lips/lipstick/new-lipstick.html
PRICE | $22.50

BONUS
So ok, listen if you are not sure of how the colors of the foundations will work on you, you can always test it out with these blister packs that have a range of 4 shades to test! Shads #04-#09 uhh and there are 16 shades to choose from that selection were just the colors they chose for me based on knowing my skin tone. AMAZING CUSTOMER SERVICE!!! What more could you ask for.

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black|Up! Video Reviews

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*Artist Spotlight | Max Factor

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Written by NZINGHA for ZFACEINC,nyc

Max Factor – The Man Behind The Make-Up

Max Factor born September 15, 1872 was of Polish Jewish decent who worked as a wigmaker and makeup artist for Russian stage productions in the late 1800s. Factor fled the east European pogroms and emigrated to the U.S. in 1902. He found himself in California 10 years later as the motion picture industry took root there.

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Factor took work as a makeup and hair stylist for film stars, and in 1914 he invented “Supreme Grease Paint,” a face makeup that still exists today

Max Factor began his career as an apprentice to a wig maker. By the age of 20, he was running his own makeup shop. Before Max Factor, few women used cosmetics. Factor popularized both the word “makeup” and the use of the cosmetic repertoire.

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Back in the 1930’s and 40’s, during the glory days of Hollywood, the world of movie make-up was dominated by Max Factor. Creating false eyelashes, the eyebrow pencil, lip gloss, and pancake makeup, Factor created a whole new language for big screen cosmetics.

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Jean Harlow, Claudette Colbert, Bette Davis, and virtually all of the major movie actresses were regular customers of the Max Factor beauty salon, located near Hollywood Boulevard.

Inevitably, once the actresses had been made to look so stylish on screen, they wanted to maintain the same effect in everyday life, so they wore the new Max Factor ‘makeup’ in personal appearances.

Soon, women unconnected with the theatre or the film industry were asking for the makeup, so that they too could look glamorous. It was in 1927 that Max Factor introduced his first cosmetics to be sold to non-theatrical consumers.

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Max Factor specialized in transforming ordinary people into dazzling stars. Its glory days were with the golden age of the movie studios, when the stars used to provide product endorsements for as little as a dollar. Their glamour rubbed off on Max Factor, and vice versa.

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Max Factor developed the celebrity endorsement concept, beginning with Clara Bow in the 1920s. Since then, stars including Rita Hayworth, Lana Turner, Marilyn Monroe, Jean Harlow, Judy Garland, Joan Crawford, Jaclyn Smith and Denise Richards amongst numerous others have all represented the brand. Many of his celebrity clients also appeared in full-color magazine ads to promote his cosmetics.

The first Celebrity Makeup Ads began with Max Factor Cosmetics. The ads featured movie stars: Judy Garland, Norma Shearer, Joan Crawford, Rita Hayworth, Dorothy Lamor, Susan Hayward and a host of others.

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The advertising campaign claimed that every girl could look like a movie star by using Max Factor makeup.

Max Factor is credited with many cosmetic innovations. Some of his innovations were the first motion picture makeup in 1914, lip gloss in 1930, Pan-Cake Makeup, forerunner of all modern cake makeups in 1937, Pan-Stik Makeup in 1948, Erace, the original cover-up cosmetic in 1954, and the first “waterproof” makeup in 1971.

An abbreviated timeline of Max Factor:

1914: Created the first makeup made specifically for motion pictures, a thinner greasepaint made in 12 shades. It was in cream form and packaged in jars, as opposed to the thicker stick grease paints used for theatre.

1920: Developed the “Color Harmony” principles of makeup, which held that “certain combinations of a woman’s complexion, hair and eye coloring were most effectively complemented by specific makeup shades”.

1925: Introduces “Max Factor’s Supreme Nail Polish”, a metal pot of beige-colored powder that is sprinkled on the nails and buffed with a chamois buffer. It gives nails shine and some tint.

1927: Creates “Society Nail Tint”, a small porcelain pot containing rose colored cream. Applied to the nail and buffed, it gives a natural rose color. “Society Nail White” also hits the market. It is a tube of chalky white liquid that is applied under nail tips and left to dry. The end result resembles the modern French manicure.

1928: Developed makeup, made specifically for use in black-and-white films. Max Sr. was awarded an Oscar for this innovation.

1930: Invented Lip Gloss

1932: Developed a line of “Television Makeup”, specifically to meet the needs of television.

1934: Introduces Liquid Nail Enamel, forerunner of today’s nail enamels.

1935: Opened the unique Max Factor Makeup Salon in Los Angeles.

1937: Created PanCake, forerunner of modern cake makeup, originally developed for color films.

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1938: Max Factor died at age 59. Max Factor Jr. expands the family run business internationally.

1940: Created Tru Color Lipstick, the first smear-proof lipstick.

1948: Developed PanStik makeup.

1954: Created Erace, the original concealer, and developed a line of cosmetics specifically for color television’s needs. (This line remains the standard for TV makeup.)

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1971: Invented the first “waterproof” makeup.

First African American Super Model to represent Max Factor Cosmetics | Beverley Johnson

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Max Factor CC Creams

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Thank You Max! — in Ode’ to Max Factor.

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Book written about the life of Makeup Artist, Inventor, Innovator, CEO Max Factor written by Fred Basten

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http://www.nytimes.com/1996/12/29/magazine/the-man-who-made-the-faces-up.html

Kenig + Alcone…Beauty Curators…a beauty ingenues heaven

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Written by NZINGHA for ZFACEINC,nyc

It was just an ordinary day for me on my way home from work. I happened to be walking towards 14th Street up 6th Avenue (in NYC). And I stopped by a window and saw beauty items. I originally wanted to go to Ricky’s that night for a special product I always use. This place would be a detour for me on the way.

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The boutique like store was closed! I knocked on the window for the attention of what looked like a sales person. We spoke through the closed glass door, I asked if they carried the item I was originally going to Ricky’s for. I thought perhaps they may have it. He said wait hold on let me look. He looked and said “No, but you may find that at Ricky’s it’s just up 14th Street.”

The original brand store in NYC called Ricky’s

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I thought to myself how sweet of him to stop to talk to me even as they are closing up the shop. I asked what time they’d be open again tomorrow so I could be sure to come back. I turned on my heels and found my way over to Ricky’s for my products.

I returned again the next day again after work but a bit earlier. Again looking through the clean clear glass windows of this beauty boutique I could see what seemed to be an endless wall of hair goodies and supplies. Well, you’ve already reeled me in! As I walked in the door to this sleek airy and modern space to my left was what looked like an electric chair. I didn’t bother to examine it because I was pulled in by what I saw…PRODUCTS!!! Turns out that that “electric chair” is the original hair perm machine used in the 1930’s. A magical, historical and vintage find!

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As a beauty Artist you find yourself always on the lookout for the next best thing that will become the “SECRET WEAPON” in your makeup kit. And sometimes the “SECRET WEAPON” is… a place. I always want to be surprised by the latest and greatest new thing on the market that will wind up becoming legendary and something my clients (celebrity & non celebrity alike) will absolutely love.

When I was deep into the store a most stunningly handsome man asked if he could help me. In my usual frank and nautily witty way I replied “Mmm you don’t even know!”, “What’s this place?…it’s new. I’ve not seen this store here before. And it says outside Kenig + Alcone? I know about Alcone I’m a big supporter of Alcone are they the owners of this store?”

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He said yes. And began to tell me of the merging of my two favourite brand stores. OMG!! I’m in love!! Truly an amazing find I thought. And funny just the night before I came here looking for products I usually find at Ricky’s!!! The irony of it!! Well, just then the same young man who spoke to me through the glass just the night before came barreling down the steps.

He said “I remember you. How are you? Where you able to find your products? My name is Ray. Ray Holt.” I loved him instantly! He took me for a tour upstairs as I told him my specialty is makeup. He asked if I knew Ricky then. I said “Ricky who?”, he said “Ricky Kenig. The owner of this store and the founder of the original Ricky’s beauty supply.” Me “WHAT?!?!” Wait a minute, Ricky’s beauty supply and Alcone merged? GENIUS!!!! Who knew! No I don’t know Ricky.”

Ray, “Surprising, everybody knows Ricky.” I guess Ray was right everybody does know Ricky if they’ve been in his store but do I know him personally,…no. “He knows everyone in the beauty industry you had to have met him.” “I should know him, his store has been my go to all throughout my career! Guess, if you think about it,… you can say I know him and he knows me.”

Well, upstairs was a virtual smorgasbord of beauty and makeup items a beauty ingenues heaven!!! There were two young MUA’s up there browsing like myself. We wound up chatting all four of us.

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This time I had to run because I was going to my next job but I wanted to meet Ray and browse the store. I would return again and upon my next visit after sending several clients to pick up items at the store, I walk in and there’s a handsome distinguished gentleman who greeted me at the door he said “Hi! Welcome to the store, I’m Ricky (with a firm handshake).”

I’m now floored by all the irony surrounding Ricky and myself today. I finally after years of supporting his other stores get to meet him today…, genius serendipity and not accidental! We spoke for at least an hour and a half ( such an amazing man, with the warmest heart and incredible brand knowledge). Please look for upcoming classes from yours truly at Kenig + Alcone Boutique.

After doing a bit of homework after my meeting the charming, stylish and enigmatic Ricky, I found out that Ricky’s was not his first beauty supply shop but “LOVE” Beauty Supply during the 80’s was! I lived for Love’s back then at the the beginning of my budding makeup career out of HS. My how we both have grown, I thought. Not only is Ricky a man with a Midas touch for beauty stores he’s got a creative talent for making things happen. Ricky Kenig is the originator of the fashion runway worlds choice hair clips and matte hair pins only found at Kenig + Alcone and created by Ricky Kenig himself.

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Well, in closing, I’ll say this…Kenig + Alcone is certainly no kitschy novelty store but a sleek, modern boutique with an almost millennium apocathary feel. It’s for the more mature polished consumer who knows about Pro Makeup and Hair brands. NY’s answer to LA’s Frends and Naime’s (I dare say Kenig + Alcone will give the West Coast brands a run for their money!). Not to mention you can find just about all of your beauty needs that a Sephora cannot fill. Specialty beauty items never seen before and only used by Celebrity Pro Makeup Artists and Hair Designers. The items as only Ricky Kenig and Alcone can deliver. BRAVO Kenig + Alcone, BRAVO 👏👏👏👏

20140416-125102.jpgKENIG & ALCONE LLC 538 Avenue of the Americas, New York, NY 10011 (917) 261-2640 10am-8pm

Why Do Most Makeup Artists Wear Black? (Part 2)

Written by NZINGHA for ZFACEINC,nyc

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Wearing black is the Artists “uniform” if you will. Wearing black is tasteful and is well groomed not over or under dressed. As one of my favourite designers Tom Ford says ” Dressing well is a form of good manners”. Hospitality is also a form of dress (atmospherical dress, setting the tone of your dressing room). Also your clients should only be able to see you and not all that you wear or anyone else on set while you’re working as being too flashy can cause distractions (more about that below).

We first discussed the functionality of black in the theater, what types of clothes to wear, some unconventional things to know in what to wear and why. I shared with you some additional Makeup Artists thoughts in Why Do Most Makeup Artists Wear Black? (Part 1)Okay, so lets talk a bit about the psychology and history of why Artists wear black.

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The fashion world goes hand in hand with the beauty world. In fact this marriage had a plan starting long ago. Designers like Coco Chanel made “The Little Black Dress” in the 20’s and it was a must have for every woman’s wardrobe because it was stunning, simple yet powerful.

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It’s was said to make every woman look their best. Well worn for a night out and looking elegant. Best dressed for ladies in suits and now trousers for work during the day. Chanel was always known for her black and white clothing designs making the wearer most chic after the post war era. Black and white both became a power colors. But black always signified both power, authority and irreplaceable style.

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And because Chanel had such an impact on the fashion world her mark has clearly been left. Now designers make their most stunning pieces in black.

So wearing black became a fashion forward trend. Not to mention wearing black creates an optical illusion in making one look more slender in their garments. Many years later not only was wearing black functional for working backstage but it also became “fashionable”.

CHANEL MODERN STYLISH COMFORTABLE FOOTWEAR

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Speaking of fashion, when I first saw the film “The Devil Wears Prada” I had a range of emotions. I went from level 1 angry to level 3 angrier! Why? Well, because I’m a firm believer in people wearing what they want to wear within reason at work.Then I thought to myself “Now it’s the truth! If you were an oil rigger you would not show up to work in LaBoutin’s, if you were a doctor you wouldn’t show up in a policeman’s uniform. Snap out of it!! It’s not personal, it’s business. And you are your business, you are your brand.”

So ask yourself viZionaire…”What am I selling?” Are you selling clothing, the products found in your makeup kit or are you selling your skill and expertise as a Makeup Artist? What are you selling…be clear about that and that will help you establish who you and your skill as an Artist.

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I wished I could come to work in this outfit however what would my level of comfort be? I’ve done it but modified my footwear. And how would I be perceived by the client? Taken seriously or a one shot deal, never to be hired again. Choosing your wardrobe is strategic and you must use wisdom on so many levels. You definitely want to leave an impression on the client yet save your personal fashion statement for your personal down time.

EXAMPLE: While working on set one day a fellow Artist came to set with an arm full of jangling bracelets. They were beautiful gold bangles, simply stunning. However while we were shooting we had to stop several times due to the fact that the sound man (who was recording live sound) could not only hear the actors doing their lines but hear those bangles just jingling!! They eventually got a word spoken to them and ultimately wound up removing them. CAUSING DISTRACTIONS AND DISTURBANCES ON SET IS HIGHLY FROWNED ON.

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The point here is, ….you dress the part and appropriately for your position in your career. If you work in the fashion, beauty and entertainment industry you dress fashionably, smartly comfortable and polished. My thoughts on “The Devil Wears Prada” I will discuss in an upcoming post.

EXAMPLE : I remember when I was working on the set of Spider-Man 3 for three straight months I would see the director of the film Sam Ramy and be amazed. Why? Because he wore a suit and shirt everyday! We worked long hours 12-16 hours in a day some days and he was always well groomed. It was rare to see but it reminded me of the splendour and dignity of Old Hollywood. Back then directors wore suits and Makeup Artists (back then it was all male Makeup Artists) wore suits or lab coats. This was how the studios crew came to work.

Makeup artist Jack Pierce and Conrad Veidt on the set of THE MAN WHO LAUGHS (1928).

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Jack Pierce in the makeup room with Boris Karloff 1935. Jack is wearing a lab coat.

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http://www.cherrybombed.com/2012/10/boris-karloff-becoming-frankenstein/

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In closing viZionaire all I’m saying to you is this. This business should not be and is not for everyone. You set the tone for how you and your work will be perceived. You set the tone for how the thought of a “Pro Makeup Artist” is perceived. So, lets strive to be excellent and restore dignity, and respectability to the title of “Makeup Artist”.

Why Do Most Makeup Artists Wear Black? (Part 1)

Written by NZINGHA for ZFACEINC,nyc

20140403-174907.jpgI’ve been asked this question on several occasions about why Makeup Arists always wear black. My response is not just about wearing black but about what we wear and how we present ourselves in general. You may not be the top fashionista but at least be presentable and groomed. You may not have the money now to build your wardrobe but in time you will and then you build your wardrobe piece by piece.

With that said here’s my answer to the question.

A: The real reason why Makeup Artists (and work crews) originally started wearing black was because in the live theater world backstage the crew wore black so they could still keep working backstage and not be seen by the audience while working.Crew would blend into the background with the black curtains and walls and usually everything backstage is black.
~NZINGHA

Just a few of My personal suggestions.

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1) Personal hygiene
…lets just say we work extremely close to people in their faces and in tight places most times

2) Keep a clean kit
…most people think that this is not important to what you wear on set BUT a clean kit is part of your wardrobe! It speaks volumes about how you are personally, how you keep yourself and the health, care and hygiene of the products you use and how you will ultimately care for your clients.

3) Wear comfortable shoes and clothing
…being comfortable is key here because you will find yourself in some situations where you will be working exceedingly long hours or varied weather conditions. Also a word to the wise as a caution… Never be too flashy with you dressing i.e. your designer wear and jewelry collection (save it for your personal down time). I once heard my client fire the wardrobe stylist because she felt like she was attempting to out dress her, look better than her (yes it’s they’re insecurity but I can cost you your job). Stay well groomed yet dress smartly.

4) Wearable workable nail length
…simple clean manicured nails for the men and clean groomed mid length nails for the ladies.

5) Know what time it is
…in other words get info about what,where, whom, time, location and weather conditions are going to be. This will put you ahead of the game so you don’t look or be prone to act the fool.

LETS HEAR FROM OTHER MAKEUP ARTISTS…

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A few more answers from other Makeup Artists about what they wear to work and why. All great answers…check it out.

A: A call sheet (the document supplied by your agency prior to a shoot, which contains all the details about the job you have been booked for) very rarely mentions clothing, but there are exceptions. On occasion for instance, it might say “dress warm” if the shoot is going to be outside on location. Once on a trip to Barbados, I remember we were instructed not to wear army camouflage clothing, and another time when we shot a campaign at a working men’s club in central London, the guys in the creative team were told they had to wear long trousers. At fashion shows when you are working for a brand, you might be given a team T-shirt. At the ones I’ve done for MAC, for example, I was supplied with a MAC Pro tee and it was requested that I wear it along with their signature shade (black). Beyond this, it’s really up to you. ~Private

A: Luckily, when I’m working everyone’s eyes are on the model, not on me. Most of my work wardrobe is black. I typically prefer pants or jeans and like flat shoes for the sake of comfort and practicality. Skinny black jeans teamed with a plain sheer T-shirt or crisp white bat-wing shirt and a pair of black sneakers is my usual uniform. If the conditions are cool, I will throw a jumper on and add a coat with leather lapels to the mix. Sometimes I will wear a cute little black dress paired with tights and pixie boots, and depending on my mood and the weather, I may pop a cashmere chunky-knit cardigan on top. Once I’m dressed, it’s all about getting my makeup kit in the car and getting to the job on time.
~ miss_supra

A: Black simple clothes (T-shirt, pants, skirt & tights, etc)

Closed in black flats, some sets and workplaces require closed toed shoes for health and safety reasons. Avoid dangly bracelets, earrings, necklaces etc.

The idea is to look chic & stylish yet be comfortable because you’ll be on your feet all day long. Try to avoid trends that are too out there as your outfit will detract from your work.

Same goes with your makeup, hair and personal grooming. Simple elegant makeup and well groomed hair that is styled well for medium to short length or tied/pinned back if long will enhance your image as a professional makeup artist. ~Private

A: I’m not trying to look cute on set, not trying to impress anyone with my outfit. My makeup and hair are always done professionally. I figure the scrubs help me blend into the background when I am not needed, I don’t disappear on set when I am doing touch-ups, and no one forgets who the makeup artist is on crew. ~ Samantha Reeder

A: When I went to my makeup training schools, they always advise us to wear black. They say it’s the signature “makeup artist attire.” The same thing was followed when I was in L’Oreal. I did retail training for the beauty advisers of Shu Uemura and the rule was to have all our makeup artists wear black. Well it only makes sense — black looks professional, it almost never looks unpolished and it any dirt hardly looks obvious on it. ~Dior

THIS COMES FROM AN UNDISCLOSED MAC COSMETICS EMPLOYEE.

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Wow!!! Who knew? And Yes, after reading the ryder, I strongly agree with MAC’s policy, with the exception of Artists who are working freelance and not for MAC but on location sets. Most freelance Artists are not sales people on freelance fashion, music, misc. projects or Union film, TV and Broadway projects.

MAC is a “brand” and has irrefutable standards and that I applaud. In addition the same grooming standard should apply to all makeup professionals. If you are a Pro Freelance Makeup Artist you should consider yourself a “brand” too. It’s simply wise business on the behalf of a freelancer.

“Here’s word for word in my paperwork”
~ Unknown

*All M.A.C Staff are required to wear 100% professional black.

*A white shirt may be worn with a buttoned-up jacket or cardigan/sweater.

*Black clothing must be clean, not fade, pulling or torn (cotton is not recommended due to fading).

*Materials with Lycra of some stretch are ideal (more durable and color fast).

*Translucent or sheer clothing must be tasteful and worn over/under solid black clothing.

*Clothes must be tastefully fashionable and appropriately fit.

*No brand logos permitted.

*Pinstripes and stitching detail need to be minimal.

*Scarves must be black, but ties may have some color.

*A M.A.C pin, chain must always be worn.

*Jewelery and accessories such as belts must be black fashionable and appropriate.

*Shoes must be professional , black and not scuffed. Tennis shoes, flip flops, “nursing shoes” or slippers are not permitted.

*Hosiery is optional, but if worn must be black or neutral. Socks also be black.

*Athletic wear such as fleece, or yoga pants and “hoodies” are not permitted.

*M.A.C theme/even shirts such as Viva Glam should only be worn on theme days as a group and not individually.

*Hair accessories and black hats may be worn at the counter so long as it does not obscure or shadow the face.

*Baseball caps are not permitted.
Hair must be neat, clean, well groomed, styled and should reflect the current trends in the industry.

*There is no restriction with hair color.

*A full well executed make-up must be worn to work at the start of shift. (For example, foundation 3 eye shadows, mascara, blush, three lip products are required (lipstick, liner, lip gloss).

*Employees may be required to wear applicable “look” associated with a new product launch. The requirement of wearing such look shall be determined by “your market” for the product(s) being launched and the current industry trends, and may be changed at discretion of M.A.C at any time.

*Personal hygiene needs to be regularly monitored bt the individual. Nails should be manicured and toes should have a pedicure when open toes are worn. M.A.C nail polish must be worn.

*Deodorant or other personal alternative to odor prevention must be qorn at all times.

*It is preferable for fragrance to be worn. If worn, the fragrance must be a M.A.C fragrance.

*Fresh breath is mandatory. If you smoke, please be sure to wash and sanitize your hands prior to returning to te counter and serving customers. Breath mints are required ater smoking.

*Absolutely no gum – small mints are acceptable.

*Cell phones, pagers etc. should be turned off and kept with personal belongings and are not permitted to work on the counter or in your brush belts. Emergency calls can be accepted at the counter.

M.A.C is admired for respecting and embracing individuality. However, it is important to remember that while at work you are expected to look, act and service our customers in the most professional manner possible.

Why we 💗 Lupita | Lancôme’s Latest Spokesmodel

Written by NZINGHA for ZFACEINC,nyc

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Nairobi’s rose and now America’s darling. Lady Lupita Nyong’o has taken our breaths away in all of her visual forms from us seeing her as her character Patsey in “12 Years A Slave” to her glorious self on the covers of magazines and in every tweet, post or comment. Even when you thought it wasn’t going to happen she was still winning!

Oh and can we say her name correctly please, especially after she’s been on several talk shows showing you how to say her last name not “GO” but “O”softly, smoothly and rhythmically.

I’m hearing people say she just came out of nowhere and stole our hearts. Well, I’m here to tell you she didn’t just come out of nowhere (no one just comes out of nowhere, everyone has a place of origin, a beginning before we met them)…she came from Kenya, Africa born in 1983 to Peter Anyang’ Nyong’o a Kenyan politician.

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Her father is the Secretary-General of the Orange Democratic Movement is currently serving as the Senator for Kisumu County

Lady Lupita has a degree from Hampshire College in film and theater studies and her Masters of Fine Arts from Yale University. She has written and directed a documentary film called “In My Genes” stories of life for the albinos population currently living in Africa. She’s also directed a music video that was nominated by MTV Africa in 2009.

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Lady Lupita is one of the few actors who has won an Academy Award for their debut performance in a feature film. Lupita was chosen as one of the faces for Miu Miu’s Spring campaign. She has won the Screen Actors Guild Award for Best Supporting Actress and numerous other awards.

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And yes Lady Lupita is *THE FIRST AFRICAN* Actress TO WIN an Oscar.

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Ralph Lauren cape dress | Lupita the fashionable

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Lupita Nyong’o is the newest face of French beauty brand Lancôme

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“I am truly honored to join the Maison Lancôme, a brand with such a prestigious history that I have always loved. I am particularly proud to represent its unique vision for women and the idea that beauty should not be dictated, but should instead be an expression of a woman’s freedom to be herself,” Nyong’o said in a statement released by the French beauty house.

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“I had to give a speech about beauty right before the Oscars,” she told WWD, “and for me, beauty is a compassion for yourself and those around you. And I think that in focusing on that, the light inside illuminates the beauty outside. The idea that Lancôme now has a few actor ambassadors is significant because actors are not just faces, they are spirits that people enjoy and relate to more than in an aesthetic way. We have the privilege of standing for something other than just looks.”

The ads will start running in September 2014.

Way Bandy (80’s) Superstar Makeup Artist #2

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Written by NZINGHA for ZFACEINC,nyc

Ronald Wright aka Way Bandy born on August 9,1941 in Birmingham, Alabama and died August 13,1986 in New York City, New York. Bandy was dare I say it one of the first Celebrity Makeup Artists along with Joey Mills, long before Kevyn Aucoin or any others. Long before social media hyped Makeup Artists or makeup enthusiasts.

Bandy first arrived in New York City in the mid-1960s and began working at a modeling school as a makeup teacher. He soon got a job as makeup director at Charles of the Ritz before leaving the company in 1971 to do makeup for the Broadway show No, No, Nanette.

Bandy gained fame when he and friend Maury Hopson transformed Martha Beall Mitchell, wife of John N. Mitchell, during a photo session with Francesco Scavullo.

Bandy only technically spent 16 years at his superstar status before his passing away. Unfortunately, Bandy had died of AIDS-related pneumonia at New York Hospital.

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Way Authored two Beauty Books by the names of “Design Your Face” and “Styling Your Face” both vintage beauty books are high on my wish list. Bandy’s book, Design Your Face, teaches his signature style of heavy eyemakeup, bleached brow, sculpted contoured foundation makeup application. Way and his contemporary Joey Mills changed the way Makeup Artistry would be viewed by the modern fashion and beauty scence. Joey and his artistry were featured in the 1978 film “Eyes of Laura Mars”. This was the beginning of the making of “Celebrity Makeup Artists”, Artists coming out from back stage to becoming center stage!

Way’s Makeup Artisry was the first Makeup work I had ever been inspired by outside of Joey Mills (who I will feature soon) and Kevyn Aucoin’s. Now He could beat a face like no body’s business!

A true Pioneer Paving the Way for further viZionaries!

Sofia Loren

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20140402-063905.jpgBandy and Joey were the first Makeup Artists that could command fees in the thousands due to their celebrity status and sheer makeup genius at the same time.

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WAY FRANK SCAVULLO’s STAFF MAKEUP ARTIST